TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Reflections from the CEO
  2. Mental Health By the Numbers
  3. Photo albums! The NAMI Walk and Sips and Saddles
  4. What’s going on? May is Mental Health Month
  5. Feature service: The Warm Line
  6. Save the date!

1. REFLECTIONS FROM THE CEO

As we move towards hurricane season,  I am reminded and inspired by the accomplishments of  NAMI Collier after Hurricane Irma. In 2017, FEMA funded Project HOPE (Helping Our People in Emergencies) and as a result we were able to provide individual and group counseling services to over 12,000 in Lee and Collier Counties. Our “Neighbor Helping Neighbor” program particularly enabled us to reach out and support the community at large.

 

The example of Copeland Florida illustrates how we help in crises. Copeland, north of Everglades City on the east end of Collier County, was totally cut off from contact after the hurricane.  The community of several hundred people quickly banded together to recover and rebuild itself. NAMI Collier contributed counseling support through the Baptist Church which had become the central hub of the town. We were also able to help bring in supplies and raise money for Copeland from across the country.  It was a community in need and NAMI Collier was able to help.

The experience of Copeland clarified for us that clinical treatment is not enough to help manage one’s mental health and it does not provide the support caregivers and communities so desperately need in times of crisis. Recovery from a mental health illness or trauma requires us to think across traditional boundaries of clinical health into the world of public health—in other words, we need to consider the many socio-economic conditions that shape our mental health.

 

Socio-economic factors include housing/shelter, food, employment, financial resources and one’s feeling of belonging to a group larger than oneself. The Report, Vital Signs, by Hodges University, (as mentioned below in our data section) points out some of the challenges we have here in Collier. For example, while poverty is dropping in Florida and the rest of the nation (US HUD 2017), it increased in Collier County between 2011 and 2017. Moreover, the population of Collier County is one of the fastest growing communities in the country and is expected to almost double by 2040. 

NAMI Collier is trying to be proactive in its response to these facts. We are focused on prevention through early assessments with children; we are training families and friends understand how they can help with care and support; we are working across multiple county groups assisting with finding housing and jobs and developing community support systems. The goal is to help “normalize” mental illness and help build our capacity to provide meaningful support.

You will be reading about our programs in our newsletters and we hope you will be our advocates with your neighbors, family, and those with whom you interact on a daily basis. NAMI Collier needs financial support; our participants need support; and families and friends need support. But we need to get our story out. 

Let us know what questions you have about NAMI Collier and we will be pleased to respond.

Pamela Baker, EdD

CEO, NAMI Collier County

2. MENTAL HEALTH BY THE NUMBERS

While this data is generic for the US, a special report, the 2018 Vital Signs Report is available, produced by Hodges University, Johnson School of Business on October 11, 2018. It has excellent data on Collier County on a number of factors from economics to demographics and compares Collier with Florida overall and the nation.

3. PHOTO ALBUMS: THE NAMI WALK AND SIPS AND SADDLES
Can you find yourself, family or friends?

THE 2019 NAMI WALK:

The best place to go to see 
what the 2019 NAMI Walk was all about is on our Facebook page (NAMI Collier) or our website (www.namicollier.org). But these few photos give you a flavor of what you missed!

 

SIPS AND SADDLES:

Sips and Saddles; An Afternoon of Dressage event on April 7 showcased national champion riders synchronized to music at a private venue in Naples.  The event raised over $90,000 for vital housing and employment programs for adults with serious mental illnesses.

Alisa and David Mirts
Elizabeth Star, Jenny Sutton, Pamela Baker
Jane and Phil Francoeur
Sandy Overton and Gina Thomas
Beautiful Decorations
Elizabeth and Stanley Star
Lynne and Chip Shotwell
Kati Dagge and Dream of Love
Pamela Baker, Robert van Teeffelen, Barbara Saxton
NAMI Collier Staff
Jason, Lindy, Lindsay and Bower Thomas

4.  WHAT’S GOING ON? MAY IS MENTAL HEALTH MONTH

Many of  our readers are moving north this month, or starting their vacation time with family. This month is Mental Health Month and we encourage you all to find out what events are going on locally that will help us in our quest for better support for our friends and families in need.
 
As we hear of events in SW Florida we will post them on our Facebook Page and our website where you can also find out what NAMI Collier is doing during this period too.

5.FEATURE OF THE MONTH: THE WARM LINE

Instead of a “Hotline” for emergency clinical services, the WARM line is a statewide, peer-run service for individuals in search of a connection with someone who has lived experience in mental health recovery. NAMI Collier’s CLEAR project, funded by the Florida Department of Children and Families, receives hundreds of phone calls each month from across the state. 
 
The Warm Line connects callers with a Florida Certified Recovery Peer Specialist who listens with the understanding and compassion only a Peer can provide. Warm Line’s specially trained operators use Intentional Peer Support and Trauma-Informed practices, along with their lived experience, to engage in mutually beneficial conversations and shared learning experiences. Callers are not required to disclose any personal information that causes discomfort to share.
 
Jenny Lapham is the CLEAR Program Supervisor. She has been serving peers in a professional role since 2014. After working as a Mental Health Advocate in Los Angeles, she relocated to SWFL where she found her place at NAMI Collier in the CLEAR program. For three years Jenny has served proudly as Coordinator for the statewide Warm Line. She is a National Certified Peer Specialist, Level 1 WRAP Facilitator, and an endorsed Helping Others Heal trainer. Her passion is in forming peer connections, speaking to the community to promote empowerment, and advocating for progress in the mental health narrative. Having been active in her own wellness plan for over 20 years, Jenny is honored to share her experience, strength and joy with others.

CLEAR Warm Line – Call  

1 (800) 945-1355

4:00 PM – 10:00 PM EST

Seven days a week, including holidays.


6. SAVE THE DATE!

 

OCTOBER FEST:  

SAVE THE DATE AND SPREAD THE WORD: 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20th, 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

THE ANNUAL NAMI LUNCHEON

SAVE THE DATE:  

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4th, 11:30 AM 

NAMI WALK 2020

SAVE THE DATE:  

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15th, 8:30 AM – 11:00 AM

AT CAMBIER PARK, NAPLES


POST SCRIPTUM

Our next newsletter in October will be coming out in print and electronic copy. Please send us an email if you would only like the electronic copy. (liz@namicollier.org) PLUS give us feedback on what you would like to read about.Thank you for your support.

 

PLEASE go on our Facebook and see the new look! Like our page and share our information and you can donate to support us as well. We are working on making it better: timely, informative and helpful: FB: NAMI OF COLLIER


AMAZON SMILE

When you shop Mother’s Day gifts at smile.amazon.com/ch/65-0047747, AmazonSmile donates to NAMI of Collier County